0
£0.00ITEMS
VIEW
BASKET
Latest news

Brewed with a View – the journey begins!

June 04 2015

Our book Brewed With a View is now available!

Featuring a selection of the world’s finest and rarest teas, the book also features stunning photography of some of Britain’s most inspiring views. Read more about the making of the book here on our blog, including photography tips from our photographer Nigel Davies.

Be sure to enter our competition to win your very own copy of Brewed With a View - simply share your inspiring view with us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and use the hashtag #dragonflyviews!
brewed with a view competition

Tips on capturing the moment:

The best camera

Although we had the benefit of using a lot of high-end equipment to get the best out of each scene we visited, it’s not always possible in reality to have all those tools to hand. Remember, the best camera in the world is the one you have with you. Don’t wait to get a better camera to start taking photos - whatever you have with you will do.

Composition

This is difficult to define precisely, but it’s always worth thinking about patterns, texture, symmetry (or asymmetry), depth of field and lines - which will draw your eye toward a focal point of the image. Play with different ways of representing the same scene by changing your perspective. You might be surprised at what comes out!

Light

Even with the use of lighting equipment, there’s no substitute for natural light and taking note of how landscapes change at different times of day. Beware of trying to shoot in harsh midday light, which will give you bright highlights and dark shadows. Try the hours around sunrise and sunset for softer light and colourful skies.

The equipment we used:

  • Hasselblad H4D camera
  • 80mm lens
  • 60mm lens
  • Elinchrom Ranger lighting packs
  • MacBook Pro
  • Lee Filters
  • Plenty of stands and sandbags

If you’ve been following us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, you will already have seen a few images from Brewed With a View. We’ve been running a competition encouraging our followers to show us their inspiring views, and the response so far has been fantastic. (Please do join in and share your inspiring view, be sure to use the hashtag #dragonflyviews!)

As you’ll already know, the art of tea is involves so much more than its constituent parts; the ritual of drinking tea should encourage us to be mindful and to savour the moment in which we find ourselves. Taking time to really savour tea, to share it and to savour the rituals that accompany it is a central component to how we approach the world of tea. And with Brewed With a View, we hope that you’ll be inspired to savour the moment too. You can now own your very own copy, which includes samples of the fine teas featured in the book.

We’ve also been immensely proud to see mentions of Brewed With a View in national publications, which has brought the project to life and exposed the idea to so many new people all across the world.

Brewed with a view - the book

 

Each one of the views in Brewed With a View took a great deal of planning, required us to brave sometimes inclement weather (especially in Scotland), and presented a unique range of other challenges, from foggy lenses to strategising how to capture a moment at exactly the right time. Here’s a brief look at what it took to capture three of our favourite shots from our photographer Nigel Davies.

Leadenhall Market Leadenhall Market Another one of our early morning shoots, it was really important on this occasion to shoot before the chaos of the morning rush. The last thing we wanted was swarms of city workers making their way through the market to their offices. We arrived at the market before dawn, when the cobbled streets were silent, and brought out a tranquil side to this busy corner of London.

Chinatown, Liverpool Chinatown, Liverpool Shooting this at exactly the right moment was the real challenge, as we wanted to balance the artificial light from the arch with the natural light of the sky. This was shot at dusk and we had to wait with the camera set up until the light was just right. Of course, the difficulty with shooting at dusk is that once things get darker, an opportunity may have been lost. In the end though, we achieved a good balance between the two contrasting types of light.

Pooh Bridge, Ashdown Forest Pooh Bridge, Ashdown Forest Traipsing through the Hundred Acre Wood with wheelbarrows, climbing up a rather large hill, and over a barbed wire fence was definitely a little more taxing than any regular game of Pooh Sticks. The Hundred Acre Wood certainly lives up to its name! After waiting for the dawn sun, we caught the perfect shot.